Nobody Likes GOP Or Obama, So Third Party Hero Will Waste Nation's Time

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Republican candidates are all so awful that there's a new frontrunner every week. Barack Obama, meanwhile, seems dedicated to little more thanenraging his own supporters while also doing nothing about the economy while also turning America into a police-terror state. People are protesting! Times are terrible! Seems like we should probably just toss the whole rotten system in the toxic waste dump and try again, maybe this time without ... corporate-welfare/warfare capitalism? No no no, that is "too radical," what we need is another ultimately unsuccessful Third Party Candidate to safely release the steam of rage from the national pressure cooker. It worked in the 1980s and the 1990s and all the way to 2000, heh heh. (Funny how Liberal Democrats kind of lost the taste for Third Party candidates after the GOP stomped back into the White House using Nader's cover, right?)


So many Third Party candidates! People like Chris Matthews love this stuff, because it adds melodrama to the puppet show. Actual humans, however, should be enraged by these sideshows. George Wallace, John Anderson, Ross Perot, Ralph Nader, what did any of these people do but prey upon the economic injustice and spiritual vacancy of American Life in the Late 20th Century? What did they do beyond wasting the time and money and energy of the only people in America mad enough to do something about it? Oh right, that's the whole point of the Third Party Candidate: Just grind people's anger and emotion back down to a harmless dust.

Anyway, here we go again, etc. The Christian Science Monitor reports:

“There is going to be a third-party candidate,” [Democratic pollster Stanley] Greenberg said Friday .... Greenberg offered several reasons for thinking a credible third-party presidential candidate will emerge. A key reason is voters’ sour mood. An NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll released earlier this week found that just 22 percent of the public thinks the nation is heading in the right direction. When Ross Perot ran as an independent presidential candidate in 1992, “those were happy times compared to now in terms of the mood of the country,” Greenberg said.

Undecided voters also are likely to favor a third-party candidate, Greenberg argued. Undecideds “are more Democratic than Republican,” he said. “They hate both parties equally. They are marginally unfavorable to Obama but they hate Romney.... I don’t know if they will be brought back to Obama. I think more likely they will vote for some third-party, anti-politics candidate that will be out there.” He noted that Bill McInturff, who runs the NPR poll with Greenberg, thinks the third-party vote could go as high as 20-25 percent.

So who will it be? Probably not a multimillionaire celebrity asshole businessman, this time around. Probably not that. The national mood isn't in the mood to be screwed that way right now. Ron Paul, maybe, although he's got as good a shot at the GOP nomination as anyone right now. Better, actually. Ron Paul may well be the 2012 Republican candidate, despite the weight of the entire corporate media pushing against any such outcome. And last time around, he specifically didn't run as an independent because he is a Republican, at heart. And running against McCain would've only made the GOP's loss in 2008 more inevitable, more pathetic, more embarrassing to the Koch Brothers.

It's a wonderful moment right now in America, because the vast majority of people completely loathe big business, Obama, the whole GOP field, Congress, military people, everybody in "public life." They are all despised. So we need an exciting, out-of-nowhere third party hero to distract everyone, stop the protests, etc., and ultimately get maybe 20% of the vote. Then the movement can die, just like it did after every other big-time Third Party Candidate lost to one of the two parties, the end. [Christian Science Monitor]

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