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U.S. Army: Best in the World, Needs a Nap

Wonkette's Department of Army operative sent along an email that went out last week to the personnel of the Information Management Support Center, who are apparently recruited from local kindergartens:


We treat others in our team as we wish to be treated. . . . Please say "please," "thank you," and "I'm sorry" when appropriate.  These are things our mothers taught us, but they seem to be missing in the work place.  No one is right all the time. . . When you are wrong. don't try to bluff your way out.  Just say "I'm sorry, I was wrong on that."
Isn't there was some kind of Geneva Convention thingee against child soldiers? Guess Rumsfeld didn't get that memo.

Full scolding after the jump.

From:   XXXXXX IMCEN [Information Management Support Center]

Sent:   Wednesday, June 02, 2004 8:19 AM

To:    IMCEN-All

Subject:   Teamwork (UNCLASSIFIED)

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED

Caveats: NONE

Folks, remember we (alright I) have selected teamwork as our cultural principle to cultivate. I am on my soapbox again. 

An essential part of teamwork is courtesy.  We treat others in our team as we wish to be treated. (Sounds like something we have heard before, doesn't it?)  That extends to being mindful of the impression that we leave and avoiding things that aggravate.  (An example would be that I tend to drum my fingers when I want a meeting to move along, but I try to avoid that as it drives some folks crazy. I should try to use a more courteous tack of asking that we conclude our remarks and move to the next subject.) 

Courtesy certainly extends to e-mail.  Don't put it in writing if you wouldn't say it directly to a person.  E-mail has an addition problem of not allowing for the use of body language and inflection that many times helps soften or explain our remarks.  If you have had a couple of e-mail exchanges with someone and the point just isn't getting through, go see that person. 

Please say "please," "thank you," and "I'm sorry" when appropriate.  These are things our mothers taught us, but they seem to be missing in the work place.  No one is right all the time (and I should really know as I make my ten mistakes a day regularly).  When you are wrong. don't try to bluff your way out.  Just say "I'm sorry, I was wrong on that."  That demonstrates your respect for your fellow IMCENite and builds their respect for you.

Folks, you are doing a great job and achieving things that are being done no where else in the Army.  Keep up the good work and lets build our teamwork!

Thanks,

XXXXXXX

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED

Caveats: NONE

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