WH Pool Report: Cleoy Coy

nice ass 2In this White House pool report, our pooler attempts "experimental food writing" to describe the meal served at the APEC conference. Results are mixed (we personally were intrigued by the thought of "eel with merken") but not bad. . .though Jeffrey Steingarten probably knows what "cleoy" is.


I'm sure you all know this, but a timble is a sort of mold used for rice and grain dishes; quinoa is an ancient grainlike seed, a bit like millet, that was an Andean staple in the time of the Incas. Congrio is a Chilean whitefish; merken is a hot spice; lucuma is an orange-colored, elongated fruit native to northern Chile; pome could be something like an apple or pear, but we're not sure what. Everybody knows what cleoy is right? I googled it and came up with a site for the Dallas County Board of Adjustment Minutes (apparently Cleoy is an actual proper name in parts of Texas) and "Did you mean to search for clay?" (Here's a special offer: the first one who can correctly place cleoy in the family of foods wins a grey or brown vinyl attache case.)
Full report after the jump. And, yes, there's a description of the Secret Service fracas.

[AFP/File/Timothy A. Clary]

From: White House Press Releases [mailto:Press.Releases@WhiteHouse.Gov]

Sent: Sat 11/20/2004 8:36 PM

Subject: POOL REPORT #8, 11/20/04

Pool Report #8

APEC leaders official dinner and cultural presentation, at the Estacion Mapocho Cultural Center.

Bush retrieves security detail; otherwise, no news. Just color and some brief experimental food writing. Basically, they had Chilean salmon with a special Andean grain, grilled congrio (whitefish) and spiced eel, fresh fruits and pastries.

Along the motorcade en route to Mapocho we saw couples and young families out enjoying the warm evening. Most would smile and wave as we passed by. There were also the sparse remnants of afternoon demonstrations. Several 20-something observers smiled then delivered middle-finger salutes as we passed by. As we briefly stopped near the event site, several young Chilean men shouted at our van. I couldn't translate exactly but it seemed to be a colloquialism pronounced as a single word: "getthefuckoutofhere," with stress on the middle syllables.

Security was tight. We didn't see this, but learned from the pre-set folks that upon arrival Chileans tried to deny the president's Secret Service detail entry into Mapocho, but the commander-in-chief turned on his heel, walked back several steps and fetched the agent or agents. I'm paraphrasing here but Bush conveyed that they were with him. Somehow the Chilean officials understood and the agents were allowed to enter unmolested. (There's an AP shot on the wire of Bush reaching for an agent.)

Mapocho is a former train station, a cavernous building comparable in scale to Union Station, which has been converted into use for performances, special dinners and the like.

In the dining room, leaders and spouses sat at a long head table - with a white tablecloth and positioned beneath a series of large pictures depicting the diversity of Chile - against one wall and elevated above room level. I'm guessing here but it looked like there were close to 2,000 guests seated at tables at floor level.

There was an extraordinary stage running the full length of the wall opposite the head table. The stage was backdropped with a breathtaking Andean scene that must have been 40 feet tall and more than 200 feet long. Part of the show included classical Andean music and dance, with performers in traditional dress, playing richly evocative tunes on panflute, guitar and other indigenous instruments.

The menu was tricky. We weren't provided with a hard copy but embassy personnel gave us the following from a phone call:

Timble of quinoa with salmon and herbs, shrimp and avocado, grilled congrio, eel with merken, broad bean puree and saute vegetables and lemon sauce, lucuma and cleoy and pome on strawberry fluff (one might substitute the word mousse here, but I'm giving you what I got); warm bread; coffee, tea, Chilean pastries and after dinner liquor.

I'm sure you all know this, but a timble is a sort of mold used for rice and grain dishes; quinoa is an ancient grainlike seed, a bit like millet, that was an Andean staple in the time of the Incas. Congrio is a Chilean whitefish; merken is a hot spice; lucuma is an orange-colored, elongated fruit native to northern Chile; pome could be something like an apple or pear, but we're not sure what. Everybody knows what cleoy is right? I googled it and came up with a site for the Dallas County Board of Adjustment Minutes (apparently Cleoy is an actual proper name in parts of Texas) and "Did you mean to search for clay?" (Here's a special offer: the first one who can correctly place cleoy in the family of foods wins a grey or brown vinyl attache case.)

Upon arrival, each leader and spouse - well, not Koizumi, who showed up alone - were greeted by President Lagos and his wife. Both couples stopped briefly on a red carpet just inside the building for photos, then the leaders were ushered into a small holding room for a reception.

We could see three bartenders in formal attire inside. They were partially cordoned off by a set of translucent, sepia-toned screens depicting natural Chilean fauna and flora, petroglyphs and other figures harkening back to the country's pre-Columbian past. Bush appeared to be in good spirits and could be seen having a very animated conversation at one point with Putin. Bush put his arm around the Russian leader's shoulder at one point; Putin put his arm against Bush's back at another.

We should be leaving here soon. I will come to the filing center to let anyone still there know the night is over, but I will plan to not write another pool report on the return motorcade unless events warrant or I find out what cleoy is.

Bob Deans

Cox Newspapers

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