Donate

And On The Seventh Day, God Created An As-Yet-Unused Login For The Fray

Wonkabout

It's quite snow-stormy out today, huh? But if you do decide to venture out of the house, one of two things might happen: One: that asshole Barry Obama will stopcalling you a coward (to your face), and two: you could stop by one of DC's like three (like 3) places to go hear an author talk about his or her new book. Plus, if known elitists Rashid Khaldi, Adam Gopnik, and David Plotz can all brave the snow, so can you.


  • Monday, March 2nd: New Wonkette novelty plaything Adam Gopnik will stop by Politics & Prose to read from his book called Angel and Ages, something about Darwin, Lincoln and capital "m" Modernity that sounds a lot like the Decemberists song "Of Angels and Angles," except more cloying, somehow. 7 PM. [Politics & Prose]
  • Despite all evidence to the contrary (cover image, title, etc.), Animal Spirits is about Keynesian economics and not tips on how to start your own incense company. Go hear its authors, one of whom won a fancy Nobel prize in economics (the highest honor for a spiritual candle distributor), talk about the dangers of laissez-faire government in terrible economic climates. [Hooks Books Events]
  • Environmentalism! It was once a fashionable thing, back when America was full of jobs and homes and we could worry about whether or not those jobs and homes would someday be washed away when the ice caps melted. Go hear about this quaint, old-timey concern at Busboys & Poets with Vandana Shiva, who talks about her new book, Soil Not Oil: Environmental Justice in an Age of Climate Crisis. 6:30 PM. [Busboys & Poets]
  • Tuesday, March 3rd: Azadeh Moaveni, who covered Iran and its most famous Columbia exchange student Ahmadinejad for Time, has written a book called Honeymoon in Tehran, about how while in Iran she also got married and had a kid (not by Ahmadinejad). 7 PM. [Politics & Prose]
  • Wednesday, March 4th: The Fat Tail, something that's maybe the sad, middle-aged, post-divorce denouement to the Long Tail (?), is also a book by Ian Bremmer and and Preston Keat about how politics affects risk management or somesuch. 7 PM. [Politics & Prose]
  • Thursday, March 5th: Rashid Khalidi, who was famously played Bill Ayers' understudy in the 2008 production of The Election, will be at Politics & Prose will be talking about how the Cold War affected contemporary Middle East relations. 7 PM. [Politics & Prose]
  • If you are a "Civil War person" (they walk amongst us, etc.), go hear Elizabeth Varon talk about "disunion," which was an idea that posited that maybe the US was just set up incorrectly, by the Founding Fathers, and eventually it would have to collapse anyway. [Hooks Books Events]
  • Saturday, March 7th: Slate editor David Plotz has turned his funsy Internet Web-Site experiment—in which he read the entire Bible and wrote dispatches about the experience—into a book. As if you weren't already quite confident that the word of Slate was the word of God. 6 PM. [Politics & Prose]
$
Donate with CC
It started with them damn hats. (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

A guest post by "Knitsy McPurlson," which we suspect is not a real name.

Yr Wonkette is not the only website run by brilliant peoples unafraid to poke people with sharp, pointy sticks. Ravelry.com – a website for knitters, crocheters, and other folks interested in textiles and fiber arts – is poking people with knitting needles, which are very sharp indeed.

This past weekend, Ravelry.com's founders showed the world how easy it is to de-platform white nationalists and racists when they banned all "support of Donald Trump and his administration" from their website, concluding they "cannot provide a space that is inclusive of all and also allow support for open white supremacy." Seems like people smart enough to decode a knitting pattern are also smart enough to decode Trump's not-so-hidden message of racism and white nationalism.

Keep reading... Show less
$
Donate with CC

One day, God willing, my grandchildren will click open their history textbooks and read about the Central American migrant internment camps. They'll learn about sick kids, locked in cages, kept hungry and dirty and cold for weeks on end, and they'll be horrified.

"Bubbie," they'll say, "how could this happen in America? How could there be toddlers sleeping on the ground without blankets, without soap or toothbrushes to clean themselves?"

"I don't know. I wish I had done more. I'm ashamed," I'll say. We will all have to answer for this atrocity. But some of us will have to answer more than others. Not just the archvillains like Stephen Miller and John Kelly, but the people who kept right on doing their jobs, even as those jobs morphed into defending concentration camps.

Keep reading... Show less
$
Donate with CC
Donate

How often would you like to donate?

Select an amount (USD)

Newsletter

©2018 by Commie Girl Industries, Inc