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Ken Ham, the Australian loonypants who runs the "Creation Museum" and the "Ark Encounter" in Kentucky, has found himself something new to be upset about! It seems this weekend, the animated TV series My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic will introduce its first officially gay characters, and Ham is very, very upset -- as you'd expect from a dude who lit up his fake Noah's Ark in rainbow colors (to steal rainbows back from the gays) and thinks that if Miley Cyrus says she's gender fluid, she may as well go do sex to barnyard animals. So Ham took to the Twitters to warn parents to be careful buying toys during June, lest they get The Gay all over them.


The episode, to be broadcast this Saturday, involves (spoiler warning) Auntie Lofty and Aunt Holiday, the guardians of a little-kid pony named Scootaloo, whose parents have never been seen in the show. (This fact resulted in a lot of glurgy fan fiction about Scootaloo the sad orphan.) When Lofty and Holiday were introduced in a novel spin-off to the series in 2017, MLP writer and producer Michael Vogel explained on the Twitters that yes, they're a couple, and a cute couple at that:

The image, we should note, is fan art by friend of Wonkette "Pixelkitties," who is worth following on Twitter if you're an animation/pop culture nerd. In replies to someone who wanted to know "Are they really lesbians in the actual book?" Vogel patiently explained, "They aren't sisters," and, "When I say 'cute couple,' I'm saying that Aunt Holiday and Auntie Lofty are a cute couple. Yes." And lo, there was some mild tut-tutting from some parts of the fandom, but mostly a collective "That's nice."

The upcoming episode will be the first time the characters have actually been animated, and it's nicely timed for Pride Month. Vogel told Buzzfeed that he and MLP showrunners Nicole Dubuc and Josh Haber wanted to be sure Aunt Holiday and Auntie Lofty made it into the TV series, which is in its final season, so the two could "officially" be part of the show's fictional world.

"I think it's fantastic that we can show that what truly defines a family is love — that, to me, is the core of My Little Pony," Dubuc said [...]

For Vogel, who is gay, it was important to him for the show to reflect the real world.

"My Little Pony has always been about friendship and accepting people (or ponies) that are different from you. So it just felt like something important to do," he said.

Fan reactions to the news has generally been positive, albeit with a significant number of people complaining about spoilers.

But then there's Ken Ham, who needed to make clear that anyone who lets their children watch a story with gay Aunties in it is surely damning their kids to a life of depravity:

And what did Ham want parents to keep in mind at all times? It was an important Bible verse that surely refers to protecting innocent children from cartoons Ken Ham dislikes:

...whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things (Philippians 4:8)

That tells you everything you need to know about children's entertainment, to be sure: "Adventure Time" is honorable, "Steven Universe" is pure (and just!), virtually anything by Hayao Miyazaki is lovely and commendable, and "My Little Pony," with its wide range of complex female characters (in a matriarchal utopia no less), is excellent and worthy of praise. Oh, yes, and now it has a couple of officially gay characters, although in fan fiction, pretty much every character has already been shipped with every other anyway. The show has even nodded to some of the fanfic about one supposed couple, Lyra and Bon Bon, with bantering dialogue about what very good friends they are. In a dream sequence, the two even have a physical relationship... of sorts.

As for Ham's fears about a brief inclusion of same-sex characters in a kids' show? Most replies just made fun of him and enjoyed pointing out that Ham's Ark Encounter "museum" recently sued its insurer for refusing to cover rain damage to the attraction.

Then Ham moved on to a truly devastating critique of the movement for LGBTQ rights: T-shirt ordering options prove the gender binary, as ordained by God.

Wow, guess the world's trans people just vanished in a puff of logic. What a smart man!

Honestly, with all the madness out there, an idiot like Ken Ham making culture-war noises about T-shirts and kid's TV shows promoting degeneracy seems positively nostalgic. "Oh look, he said lesbian cartoon horses cause depravity! Isn't that retro?"

[Buzzfeed / Comics Beat]

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Doktor Zoom

Doktor Zoom's real name is Marty Kelley, and he lives in the wilds of Boise, Idaho. He is not a medical doctor, but does have a real PhD in Rhetoric. You should definitely donate some money to this little mommyblog where he has finally found acceptance and cat pictures. He is on maternity leave until 2033. Here is his Twitter, also. His quest to avoid prolixity is not going so great.

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It started with them damn hats. (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

A guest post by "Knitsy McPurlson," which we suspect is not a real name.

Yr Wonkette is not the only website run by brilliant peoples unafraid to poke people with sharp, pointy sticks. Ravelry.com – a website for knitters, crocheters, and other folks interested in textiles and fiber arts – is poking people with knitting needles, which are very sharp indeed.

This past weekend, Ravelry.com's founders showed the world how easy it is to de-platform white nationalists and racists when they banned all "support of Donald Trump and his administration" from their website, concluding they "cannot provide a space that is inclusive of all and also allow support for open white supremacy." Seems like people smart enough to decode a knitting pattern are also smart enough to decode Trump's not-so-hidden message of racism and white nationalism.

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One day, God willing, my grandchildren will click open their history textbooks and read about the Central American migrant internment camps. They'll learn about sick kids, locked in cages, kept hungry and dirty and cold for weeks on end, and they'll be horrified.

"Bubbie," they'll say, "how could this happen in America? How could there be toddlers sleeping on the ground without blankets, without soap or toothbrushes to clean themselves?"

"I don't know. I wish I had done more. I'm ashamed," I'll say. We will all have to answer for this atrocity. But some of us will have to answer more than others. Not just the archvillains like Stephen Miller and John Kelly, but the people who kept right on doing their jobs, even as those jobs morphed into defending concentration camps.

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