Creepy Blue Lives Matter Group Tricks Black Church Into Hosting Rally

Protests

When Friendship-West Baptist Church in Dallas was asked if it could hold a Black Lives Matter rally on the grounds of the church, it was more than happy to host. The church already even had a large Black Lives Matter banner hanging outside!

However, when the group showed up, it was not Black Lives Matter at all — it was a "Back The Blue" rally, complete with Confederate flags, Trump flags, and of course, those thin blue line flags. For whatever reason (assholes, it's because they're assholes), this "Back The Blue" group thought it would be real cute — at this particular moment in time — to troll a black church by posing as a Black Lives Matter group.



As if that wasn't bad enough, according to a video posted to Facebook by senior pastor Dr. Frederick Douglass Haynes III, when the group showed up, they attempted to intimidate them. He didn't say exactly how, but showing up to a black church with a bunch of trucks with confederate flags, thin blue line flags and Trump flags attached to them is pretty intimidating in and of itself.

Via RawStory:

"Today we experienced deceit and hate from a group of individuals in support of Blue Lives Matter," the group said in an Instagram post. "An individual contacted us in need of meeting space for a Black Lives Matter Rally. In support of the movement, we agreed to allow the Black Lives Matter Rally happen in our parking lot. The rally turned out to be a Blue Lives Matters [sic] meet up where individuals flew Trump 2020 flags and a Confederate Flag. Once we realized the deceit and false information, our staff and Senior Pastor, Dr. Frederick Douglass Haynes, III. immediately asked the individuals to shut it down and leave."

"This event was only able to happen because of deceitfulness and lies and in no way reflects the mission and ministry of Friendship-West Baptist Church," the church also said. "Please know that our pastor and staff will get to the bottom of this. We sincerely appreciate your understanding of this matter, and we'd like to thank everyone for their support and prayers. May God Bless You All and please stay safe."

The event was also breathlessly reported on by James Hartley of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, who neglected somehow to mention the group had creepily posed as a Black Lives Matter group in order to use the parking lot of the church.

He also quoted the organizer of the rally, Nathan Abrams, who claimed they didn't want Confederate flags (which he called "Dixie flags") or Trump flags — which is so very weird, because other people managed to get pictures of both of those things.

He then wrote an article on the rally all about how the nice and very apolitical Back The Blue Cruise just wanted to do a rest stop at the church and was cruelly turned away and told they were the KKK, even though they were previously given permission by a church employee.

Prepare for a full body cringe, via the Fort Worth Star-Telegram:

Despite [organizer Nathan] Abrams' hopes that the event would be about unity and support for law enforcement instead of politics, things became political when the group stopped at Friendship-West Baptist Church in Dallas for a pit stop.

The church, which participates in social activism and has a large "Black Lives Matter" banner on one of its walls, posted a video on its social media pages calling the gathering an undercover KKK rally.

Oh, the poor dears. The organizers also claimed the church had only just put up the Black Lives Matter banner, probably to spite them or for some other very suspicious reason. Or, you know, because they were expecting a Black Lives Matter rally to be held there.

Both organizers also said they hadn't seen the Black Lives Matter banner before.

"I live in that area," Broady said. "I drive past that church all the time and I've never seen that banner before."

And then, after going back to how very mean the parishioners were to the nice apolitical cop-lovers, Hartley admitted there was, in fact, a confederate flag there. Whoops!

Members of the church took to social media and some came to the church when they found out the group had parked there.

Some church members who showed up watched while others videoed and some raised fists or middle fingers into the air as the group drove out.

On social media, church members compared the gathering to a Klan rally. Broady, a Black man, said there was no intent to antagonize the church or appear as a Klan rally and he believed there was a miscommunication.

While organizers said they banned any political flags, such as Trump or any Confederate flags, Broady said there was one case of a Confederate flag being flown at the church. Broady said he personally made sure the flag was taken down.

Ah, the liberal media!

[RawStory]

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Robyn Pennacchia

Robyn Pennacchia is a brilliant, fabulously talented and visually stunning angel of a human being, who shrugged off what she is pretty sure would have been a Tony Award-winning career in musical theater in order to write about stuff on the internet. In addition to her work at Wonkette, she also has a biweekly column at Dame. Follow her on Twitter at @RobynElyse

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