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Don't Worry About Paying For College In The Depression Because Nobody Will Go To College

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Eliot Spitzer has a great idea for making college more affordable! Ha, not really. But he has an idea about how we can make it possible for people to pay back their $160,000 loans from undergrad without ending up in debtor's prison.


The basic idea is that instead of paying a fixed (and massive) amount every month, which is very hard when you're just out of college and making $20,000 a year working for Clean Water Action, you would pay some percentage of your income. The more you make, the more you pay, until you're done.

This all sounds great, except for this minor point: Who the fuck, in the middle of a deep global DEPRESSION, will continue to borrow six-figure sums to finance an undergraduate education which is not, it turns out, any guarantee of future employment anyway?

Your editor is not exactly an economist, so maybe the following theory is all complete hooey. But does it not strike anyone that the current (and likely short-lived) attitude about education, that it costs what it costs and if it is terrifyingly high well that is just the price of doing business these days, sounds a lot like what people were saying about real estate in a couple years ago? This whole, "Get in now and don't worry about being fleeced because otherwise you're completely doomed" attitude?

In addition, the notion that the educational market does not respond to basic laws of supply and demand, and that it can continue to command an endless supply of middle-class youngsters paying $40,000 a year tuition even as that amount threatens to supercede their parents' annual incomes, just seems ... wrongheaded.

To conclude: Thanks, Eliot Spitzer! You have successfully solved America's college education dilemma from 2005.

Loan Ranger [Slate]

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It started with them damn hats. (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

A guest post by "Knitsy McPurlson," which we suspect is not a real name.

Yr Wonkette is not the only website run by brilliant peoples unafraid to poke people with sharp, pointy sticks. Ravelry.com – a website for knitters, crocheters, and other folks interested in textiles and fiber arts – is poking people with knitting needles, which are very sharp indeed.

This past weekend, Ravelry.com's founders showed the world how easy it is to de-platform white nationalists and racists when they banned all "support of Donald Trump and his administration" from their website, concluding they "cannot provide a space that is inclusive of all and also allow support for open white supremacy." Seems like people smart enough to decode a knitting pattern are also smart enough to decode Trump's not-so-hidden message of racism and white nationalism.

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One day, God willing, my grandchildren will click open their history textbooks and read about the Central American migrant internment camps. They'll learn about sick kids, locked in cages, kept hungry and dirty and cold for weeks on end, and they'll be horrified.

"Bubbie," they'll say, "how could this happen in America? How could there be toddlers sleeping on the ground without blankets, without soap or toothbrushes to clean themselves?"

"I don't know. I wish I had done more. I'm ashamed," I'll say. We will all have to answer for this atrocity. But some of us will have to answer more than others. Not just the archvillains like Stephen Miller and John Kelly, but the people who kept right on doing their jobs, even as those jobs morphed into defending concentration camps.

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