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We are running out of adjectives to describe this year's midterm election in Kansas. Shocking and crazy have been maxed out and fail to capture the shocking craziness that a state Mittens Romnington won by more than 20 points in 2012 could be about to throw three of its biggest-deal conservatives out of office. These visionaries, through sheer laziness, incompetence, and partisan zeal, might be on the verge of achieving the impossible: sucking enough to lose in Kansas as a Republican.

Gov. Sam Brownback, having been tagged not so long ago as a possible presidential contender for 2016, faces an unexpectedly steep climb toward re-election after drifting too far to the right. For Kansas. Brownback pushed through sweeping income tax reductions for the state's wealthiest and boosted primary challengers for any moderate Republican legislators who objected, then was shocked when all that lost tax revenue left a flaming budget chasm that Kansas had to jump on its fiscal dirtbike. It'll be okay, though! Sam figured out that the state's poor people and schoolchildren (and especially the poor schoolchildren) had some extra money they didn't need for food or teachers.

Brownback's late realization that his "experiment" with starving social services and schools to keep one-percenters' yachts staffed might not be cool with some people led to this recent exchange with Jeff Greenfield from PBS, via Rachel Maddow. Here, a flustered-looking governor explains that his radical rollback of taxes on the rich, this new thing that Kansas is trying, is not anything new. What's so different about this crazy plan that's never been tried before?