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WH Pool Report: Election Cycles Edition

nice_pantsIn this White House pool report, our pooler gives a shout-out to the fashionistas: "[Barbara Bush] was wearing flared white trousers and a tight turquoise top under a chocolate brown, crepe-like three-quarter sleeved wrap, tied under the bodice. Accessories: brown, open-toed high-heeled sandals and turquoise drop earrings." We also learn that the president likes something French -- The Tour de France -- but that's okay, because Texan Lance Armstrong is "going to win and I'm going to win. There's no need to worry about either race any more."


Full report after the jump.

Pool Report #1

Andrews AFB to Tampa, FL

Marine One was wheels down at 8:23 a.m. Daughter Barbara followed her father down the helicopter steps and walked with him up the gangway to Air Force One. (Fashion mavens: She was wearing flared white trousers and a tight turquoise top under a chocolate brown, crepe-like three-quarter sleeved wrap, tied under the bodice. Accessories: brown, open-toed high-heeled sandals and turquoise drop earrings.) Senior staff following behind included Steve Hadley, Joe Hagin and Scott McClellan. Air Force One - the 757 version - was wheels up at 8:37 a.m.

Scott gaggled enroute, commenting on violence in Iraq, the situation in Sudan, human trafficking. Also gave the week ahead. See transcript for details.

The Tour de France was on the video monitors throughout the flight, and Scott admitted during the gaggle that the president has been watching the tour, including during the flight.

Meanwhile, intrepid AP reporter Scott Lindlaw passed a note via staff to the president, in which he asked what the president thought of the tour and whether fellow Texan Lance Armstrong would pull off a record-breaking sixth win. Following the gaggle, Bush wandered into the adjacent cabin, caught Lindlaw's eye, and said: "He's going to win and I'm going to win. There's no need to worry about either race any more.'"

Wheels were down in Tampa at 10:20 a.m. Brother Jeb waited at the bottom of the gangway. The brothers forswore bear hugs for a hearty handshake, with Jeb supplementing with a slap on the side of POTUS's arm. Barbara got a kiss from her uncle.

The motorcade departed at 10:30 a.m. Just before reaching the event site in Tampa, several hundred protesters were visible along the street, some holding Kerry signs and others holding pink signs reading "Justice for all."

Maura Reynolds

Los Angeles Times

[AP Photo/Steve Nesius]

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It started with them damn hats. (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

A guest post by "Knitsy McPurlson," which we suspect is not a real name.

Yr Wonkette is not the only website run by brilliant peoples unafraid to poke people with sharp, pointy sticks. Ravelry.com – a website for knitters, crocheters, and other folks interested in textiles and fiber arts – is poking people with knitting needles, which are very sharp indeed.

This past weekend, Ravelry.com's founders showed the world how easy it is to de-platform white nationalists and racists when they banned all "support of Donald Trump and his administration" from their website, concluding they "cannot provide a space that is inclusive of all and also allow support for open white supremacy." Seems like people smart enough to decode a knitting pattern are also smart enough to decode Trump's not-so-hidden message of racism and white nationalism.

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"Bubbie," they'll say, "how could this happen in America? How could there be toddlers sleeping on the ground without blankets, without soap or toothbrushes to clean themselves?"

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