Neo-Nazi Attempted Hospital Bomber Was In Communication With Neo-Nazi Attempted News Station Bomber

Right Wing Extremism

On Tuesday, 36-year-old aspiring neo-Nazi terrorist Timothy Wilson decided that it would be a really, really good idea for him to go bomb a Kansas City medical facility currently housing COVID-19 cases. Having most of what he needed, he headed out to Belton, Missouri, to pick up what he thought was a car bomb, only to be greeted by FBI agents. Predictably, Wilson did not go gently, there was a shootout, and he suffered injuries he later died from. In a hospital.

It turned out that the FBI had been watching Wilson for over a year; he'd come up on their radar due to communications between him and Jarrett William Smith, another neo-Nazi who had been arrested back in September for his plans to bomb a major American news network and assassinate Beto O'Rourke. While the FBI was investigating Smith, they found discussions between him and Wilson on how to build an IED.

Smith was an active Army soldier — though he did not join the military until after he had been radicalized and expressed his desire to go to Ukraine to fight along side the Azov Battalion, a far-right military group known for committing war crimes and being Nazis.

Wilson's goal was, essentially, to "capitalize" on the coronavirus outbreak — causing even more devastation by bombing a medical facility where people with the virus were staying. The FBI suggests that there may be more neo-Nazis out there looking to do this, but doubt that any are planning anything as severe as what Wilson was planning.


Nick R. Martin of The Informant, which covers hate and extremism in America, reports that Wilson was active in at least two Telegram-based neo-Nazi groups, the National Socialist Movement (NSM) and Vorherrschaft Division (VSD), posting under the pseudonym "Werewolf 84." As recently as the day before the attempted bombing, he was in chat rooms blaming the coronavirus on Jewish people.

Via The Informant:

Wilson was listed as one of the administrators of the public Telegram chat for the NSM and was active there as recently as Tuesday afternoon. He wrote at the time that he believed the COVID-19 pandemic was being used by the government as an "excuse to destroy our people."

"Mark my words it's coming I hope people are ready," he wrote.

The day prior, he used antisemitic language to comment about an article on the coronavirus outbreak.
"If you don't think this whole thing was engineered by Jews as a power grab here is more proof of their plans,"

Wilson wrote. "Jews have been playing the long game we are the only ones standing in their way."

Wilson's Telegram activity also demonstrated an obsession with The Order, a 1980s neo-Nazi terrorist group, as well as its leader, Robert Jay Mathews, who died in a shootout with federal agents in 1984.

In January, Wilson posted a photo of several members of The Order in the Telegram channel for VSD and added a caption: "Remember our heroes."

Then on Sunday, Wilson posted a photo of Mathews in the NSM channel.

"Don't be the cuck that gives up without a fight," Wilson wrote. "Make uncle bob proud."

While it may seem counterintuitive to bomb buildings in hopes of attracting people to your cause by doing something as horrific and repulsive as bombing a hospital, it seems pretty clear that attacks like these tend to do just that. It's hard to deny that it's happening. Elliot Rodger inspired multiple men to go out and kill a bunch of people to punish the world for their not getting laid, and there are also certainly far more "incels" now than there were before he went on his killing spree. Prior to Rodger, the "incels" were a fairly small group of maybe a couple hundred men on one forum called PUAHate — and although that particular forum shut down after the murders, now there are tens of thousands of them on multiple forums. Dylann Roof, too, has inspired several racist killers, including the recent New Zealand mass murderer, as well as a whole lot of people online.

It's hard to be sure why. Maybe people who are already a little off go, "Wow, what could someone have felt so passionately about that they were willing to do something like that?" and start to look into it. Maybe increased discussion of their terrible beliefs makes people go, "Hey, I think I believe that too! Maybe that's what my problem in life is? Maybe this is how I can feel important?" We certainly spend a lot of time socializing people, men in particular, to believe that the most noble thing they can do is to die for their country, and as messed up as it sounds, that's what a lot of them think they are doing.

[ABC]

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Robyn Pennacchia

Robyn Pennacchia is a brilliant, fabulously talented and visually stunning angel of a human being, who shrugged off what she is pretty sure would have been a Tony Award-winning career in musical theater in order to write about stuff on the internet. In addition to her work at Wonkette, she also has a biweekly column at Dame. Follow her on Twitter at @RobynElyse

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