Victoria Jackson is ready to be elected as the next member of the County Commission of Williamson County, Tennessee, and she proves it in an interview with the Nashville Tennessean. She just wants to save America, or at least her corner of it, from everything that's going wrong, and like lots of wingnuts, she thinks that includes just about everything. Kudos to reporter Jamie Page for going to Thompson's Station, Tennessee, to meet Jackson for his profile of Wonkette's Favorite Frenemy; it's both critical and fair, which is a pretty tough balancing act to pull off. (Happily, we can be a little less journalistic here.)

He starts the piece with a mention of one of V-Jack's recent gifts to the world, which we had somehow missed, in which she responded to a Muslim family moving in near her neighborhood with a blog post titled "Civilization Jihad Hits Home (my back yard, literally"). She wasn't just worried about the presence of the new neighbors, Daoud Abudiab and his family; no, she was especially exercised that Mr. Abudiab had the gall to speak at a school board meeting and question good patriotic Americans' fears that school textbooks are "suddenly biased toward Islam." She's pretty sure that Abudiab's concerns for his son and his mention of the 2007 firebombing of the Columbia Islamic Center are really just a sinister ploy for sympathy: "Playing the victim is part of the strategy in stealth jihad."

So anyway, what we're saying is that Victoria Jackson got her name in the local paper. She even talked to the reporter, so it's good to know that although the lamestream media is full of lies, she's still willing to engage with them.

Oh, OK, one more thing about that neighbor -- Jackson reports that a friend alerted her to a Facebook post by Daoud Abudiab in which he writes that Jackson "has friends who support her in making Williamson County a scary place to live for some of us." Happily, ever the fact-monger, Jackson replied with this highly accurate chart (her filename is literally "Islam-Bad.png"):

She explains:

He’s afraid of me?!

According to these statistics, I should be afraid of him!

OK, now we're done with that. In her interview with Page, Jackson explains that she believes that she's engaged in “a spiritual battle over the soul of America,” which is why she's protested the construction of a mosque in Murfreesboro. She also compares living in Tennessee to her previous home in the Miami, Florida area, where her husband, William Paul Wessel, is a police officer:

“Living in Miami, I felt like I was in a foreign country. Living in L.A. and New York, I felt like I was Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego in the fiery furnace, and living here I feel like I have died and went to heaven,” Jackson said. “I mean, there was a Bible in my dentist office here, and people are so nice.

“Nashville has two of my favorite things: Jesus and show business,” she said.

Indeed, a cynic might almost suggest that the two are combined a whole heck of a lot. Jackson also said tht her main sources of information on the world are the Bible and a variety of rightwing websites, especially World Net Daily and breitbart.com, so you know she's got a pretty clear understanding of reality. She reveals that she never voted until she was 37, when she voted against Bill Clinton, and when her husband explained that she had to be registered to vote, she had a Deep Insight:

“He said, ‘You have to register.’ I said, ‘Register? Where do you register?’ ” Jackson said. “And that’s the point: People don’t know these things.”

So that's part of why she's running, to educate people about what voting is, and what a ballot is, which she contends most people don't know about, and that lack of knowledge is why we have tyranny today.

Page also provides more biographical detail on Jackson than we've seen most places, and she tells him a pretty interesting anecdote about a conversation from her Saturday Night Live days:

Religion rarely came up.

Cast member Al Franken — now a Democratic senator — once told her he and some other cast members didn’t buy her “ditzy act,” she said. Jackson responded that her voice was the result of a unique throat condition called congenital palatal deficiency.

“I told him maybe I am overcompensating because everybody here is going to hell and I’m supposed to tell them about Jesus.”

She said Franken’s face turned white. He walked away and stopped speaking to her.

Can't imagine why -- probably because he is a hater.

V-Jack also says that she has discovered that “People are mean in local politics,” following the reaction to her very public freakout over tiny cartoon genitals in a sex-ed book. See, she'd said that the book, It’s Perfectly Normal, was on a list of approved 4th-grade reading in Tennessee schools, and then a bunch of meanies went and said that it actually was not on any state approved reading lists, and that it's not being used in schools, and that is just so mean, because

“I didn’t say it was used as a textbook in classrooms; I only said it was in Tennessee schools,” Jackson said later. “It could be in a teacher’s office or the library.”

We suspect that this game of playing the victim is a typical part of stealth butthurt, and is just a ruse to get sympathy while her kind try to take over America.

Jackson told Page that she's not raising funds or running a highly public campaign, but did not mention Yr Wonkette's kind offer to provide her with campaign materials. Her top priority if she wins the seat -- which she's not expecting -- is to put an end to the Common Core education standards, which she said are the “federal government’s way of controlling your child’s minds.”

Also, we would really like to know more about an intriguing tidbit that Page dangles near the end of the piece:

Behind all of the passionate talk is someone who admits that she doesn’t expect to win, and supports two of her challengers, Karen Entz and incumbent Betsy Hester. She speaks especially highly of Entz, who, when contacted, angrily refused to comment about Jackson.

Why so angry, Ms. Entz? Just annoyed to be in the same district as V-Jack? We can see that -- we feel the same way about having to share a hemisphere with her.

[The Tennessean / Victoria Jackson]

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Doktor Zoom's real name is Marty Kelley, and he lives in the wilds of Boise, Idaho. He is not a medical doctor, but does have a real PhD in Rhetoric. You should definitely donate some money to this little mommyblog where he has finally found acceptance and cat pictures. He is on maternity leave until 2033. Here is his Twitter, also. His quest to avoid prolixity is not going so great.

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